16 Themed Submission Calls for Writers in June

The themes for these anthologies/websites/magazines include stories on LGBTQ lives, the invisible world, corporate shadows (inspired by the net neutrality rulings), anthropomorphic fiction, holiday crime and crime by bumbling sidekicks, work and play, deadly bargains, curiosity and the curious, addiction, and talking to strangers. Some of these also accept nonfiction and poetry. Many of them pay writers. Also see this list for some more deadlines coming up.

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Creative Ink Festival

Picture It and Write!

On 19th May, New West Writers are holding a critiquing session as part of the Creative Ink Festival.

Details can be found at the bottom of the page here

Or you can email

ashtal@gmail.com with a subject line of New West Writers – Critique

 

 

Paying markets for your writing

Picture It and Write!

New West Writers – here are some paying markets for your writing, courtesy of Chloe.

  1. 11 Magazines that Pay Writers $200 Per Short Story
    Next Show All These calls for submissions accept fiction and pay up to $200; a few pay considerably more. They are currently open for submissions or have submission windows ending soon. Also see this list for short story markets that pay $300; some deadlines are coming up. — S. Kalekar Pulp Literature They want any… Keep reading…
  2. 7 Magazines that Pay Writers $150 Per Article
    Next Show All The following is a list of seven magazines that pay writers at least $150 for some of the articles they publish. We’ve done our best to do accurate research. However, keep in mind that you may need to negotiate payment — and that rates do change. Included is variety of magazines, covering… Keep reading…
  3. $3,000 Short Story Contest from the American Bar Association Journal
    The ABA Journal is currently hosting the The Ross Writing Contest for Legal Short Fiction. The contest offers a $3,000 prize for “original works of fiction of no more than 5,000 words that illuminate the role of the law and/or lawyers in modern society.” According to their submission guidelines: Contest entries will be judged by… Keep reading…
  4. 79 Travel Magazines, Websites, and Blogs that Pay Writers
    Next Show All There are so many websites, magazines, and blogs that publish travel writing. Here is a list of 79 such publications. According to our research, all of these magazines accept pitches/submissions directly from freelance writers — and all of these publications pay for the writing they publish.We’ve researched the payment rates, when available…. Keep reading…
  5. 14 Paying Anthology Markets for Spring 2018
    Next Show All The competition may be stiff for some of the well known anthologies, but getting one of your short stories published can open up numerous other publishing opportunities for you, including book deals. But that does not mean you should skim over the lesser known anthologies. There are just as many benefits to… Keep reading…
  6. 53 Magazines, Websites, and Blogs that Pay Writers
    Next Show All The following is a huge list of magazines, websites, and blogs that pay writers. We’ve done a lot of research to put this list together, with contributions from Tatiana Claudy and S. Kalekar. Keep in mind that the payment information listed here could be out of date or not correct. While we… Keep reading…
  7. $10,000 Short Story Contest (Free)
    The Story Shares organization has officially launched their 2018 Story of the Year writing contest, with the goal of creating more “just-right” book choices for the millions of teens and adults around the world who struggle with reading. This year’s writing contest includes total prizes of $10,000 USD. The prizes are, as follows: $3,000 Diversity… Keep reading…

Ecuadorian Squirrel Hawk

The Ecuadorian Squirrel Hawk

During the evolution of the hawk species, one particular branch, the males of the Ecuadorian Squirrel Hawk, started attacking animals purely to satisfy their own vanity.

The male Ecuadorian Squirrel Hawk would build a nest in the traditional manner. Then It would try to attract a mate. The unusual method of attraction used by this bird was not a display of hunting prowess or an elaborate dance. The male hawk would clinically remove the tail from any mammal it could find and then hang these tails from the nest to try and attract a female hawk. Over the years, the squirrel hawk must have deduced that squirrel tails worked the best and so decided it could hunt rats, mice, and other rodents for food, but squirrels should be left alone as their tails were more important than their meat for the preservation of this hawk species.

The male hawk would place the squirrel tails in fetching arrangements designed to impress the female hawk. Some hawks would drape the tails over the sticks in the nest to make the nest more comfortable for their potential partners. Other hawks would hang the tails from the nest, where they would sway in the wind and catch the eye of any passing females.

The unusual behaviour of these birds has also led to a change in the appearance of Ecuadorian squirrels, whose tails are, on average, 65% shorter than in other squirrel species. These squirrels also sit on their tails when at rest unlike other squirrels whose tails stick out behind them when they are sitting still eating a nut. It’s also believed the Ecuadorian  Ground Squirrel may have evolved from particular families of Ecuadorian Squirrels who lived close to hawk’s nests and who were attacked more than other squirrels.

These squirrels confused early explorers who would see a squirrel that had been attacked by an Ecuadorian Squirrel Hawk and conclude they had found the squirrel equivalent of the Manx Cat.  Once the explanation was discovered, some Victorian explorers even began to explore the Isle of Man, looking for a Manx Cat Hawk, a potential distant relation of the Ecuadorian Squirrel Hawk, but no evidence of this bird was ever found.  

NWW Photo Prompt ~ Palm Fronds

Welcome back to the NWW Photo Prompt!

The New West Writers Photo Prompt is a twice-monthly challenge for writers of all genres. It’s easy to participate — and we encourage everyone to do so. Just spend a moment with the image below and write whatever comes to mind. A couple of lines, or a couple thousand words. Prose, non-fiction, poetry, even a six word story, if you like.

Grand Cayman - Queen Elizabeth Botanic Garden - Palm Fronds
Palm Fronds

Queen Elizabeth Botanic Garden

Grand Cayman

There are no winners (we’re all writers sharing our words) and no rules. Well, one — be respectful with your words.

You can announce your post with a link in a comment below, or if you link to this page from your post, we’ll publish the trackback link in the comment section of this page. Add an “nww photo prompt” tag to your post and we’ll also provide a link to your response in the next challenge. This post outlines these few simple steps.

To get you going, one of our writing group’s members will have the first go at the prompt. Base your post on theirs or go a completely different way.

Palm Fronds
by Julian Worker

When I first saw this image, I felt I was The Creator at the beginning of The Big Bang witnessing the right-hand side of the creation of our current universe. Photons escape the explosion and start their never-ending journey into the darkness, like a train that never comes out of a tunnel. Patches of dark matter are about to turn into the first stars and galaxies. Matter and anti-matter are mutually annihilating each other and yet why did this explosion, this bang produce more matter than anti-matter? If it had produced equal amounts, we wouldn’t be here. Black Holes, Brown Dwarfs, and Red Shift haven’t come into existence. Atoms that will create us all are being manufactured, and electrons, neutrons, and quarks. The whole of all our existence is here in a dense blanket of seething, boiling creativity. And in this image there is just the first 1 thousandth of a second of time, a snapshot of creation, an instance from the beginning. All this can be seen in a palm frond, if you know what you are looking for.

Happy writing!

Dimples
Dimples

Here are the posts written in response to the July 15th NWW Photo Prompt: (If we missed yours, please let us know!)

Dimples, by Chloe Cocking
Violin of the Sea, by aidyl93
The HSBC Stradivarius, by Julian Worker
Dimples, by Gifford MacShane
Dimples, by Christine Grimard
How to handle dimple, by Jessica
I prefer the cello, but it is still theft, by Patrick Jennings

The Museum of Used Candles – Frisby-on-the-Wreake

This museum in England has been collecting the used candles of the rich and famous for 20 years. The proprietor, Anne Wickham, started the museum in 1994 after a Women’s Institute meeting where she found that all her fellow members found it difficult to throw away their used candles as they were like dear, old friends.

Anne decided to keep those candles and to turn them into a tableau, which she entitled “Growing Old” drawing parallels between the ageing of the WI members and the way the wax had melted and formed wrinkles on the surface of the candles.

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The Role of Research

The role of research in my writing depends on the piece.

My travel articles are all written during and after my visit to a particular place. Sometimes it seems like I am an integral part of the story, such as when I write either about people I have met or about the effect a place has had on me. On other occasions, the story can tell itself without my presence. I don’t or can’t add anything to the story and so the description of the place is enough. My research will consist of writing down my thoughts in a notebook and collating these words later when I return home.

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